Primary care recruitment and retention strategy for Ontario

Evidence from around the world, and Ontario, demonstrates that the introduction of primary care teams is providing patients with better care, at the best value. But one of interprofessional primary care’s biggest barriers is to attract and keep skilled providers. The key issue? Inability to offer competitive compensation to the non-physician health professionals and administrative staff who work in our community health centres, family health teams, nurse practitioner-led clinics and aboriginal health access centres.

Primary care must lead care coordination

We assert the role of primary care providers to lead care coordination.

The Association of Family Health Teams of Ontario (AFHTO) endorses and embraces this position statement adopted with our colleagues in the Ontario Primary Care Council in November 2015.  Primary care providers work to ensure access to interprofessional care for patients and identify a single point of contact to help patients and families navigate and access

Primary care teams in a population-based health system

Population-based primary care is about effective management of the health of defined groups of people. It ensures all within this group are attached to a regular primary care provider and can access the appropriate care when they need it. The province’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care convened an Expert Advisory Committee to recommend how to ensure access to appropriate care for all Ontarians.