Poster Displays

Posters at the AFHTO 2020 Conference:

2020 Key Dates:

  • October 8 & 9 - AFHTO 2020 Virtual Conference

Online Poster Gallery

An online gallery of posters will be made available to attendees on the virtual platform during the conference. All poster presenters listed should be registered for the conference- to chat with poster presenters, search up the poster presenter's name(s) in the conference platform's attendee list to start a conversation. 

Interactive Sessions available!

During the final session timeslot of each conference day, we will open the floor for you to chat with and ask questions to your favourite poster presenters. Check below to see who's available!

Posters available at the conference:

    Poster # Theme Title Summary
    1 1. Mental health and addiction support in primary care

    Spotlight on Health Care Staff: Mental Health and Wellness Initiatives

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

      Chat session for this poster will be available on Friday, Oct. 9, 12:00 noon- 12:30 at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    We know that the Covid-19 pandemic has contributed to mental health challenges for many people, including front line health care workers. In response to the pandemic and the necessary, sudden and drastic impact it has had on living and working conditions, the Sunnybrook Academic Family Health Team (SAFHT) launched several initiatives to engage staff in wellness activities and to emphasize the particular importance of self-care during this time.    A few weeks after most staff members were instructed to begin working from home, the SAFHT pandemic leadership team proposed a ‘Doing Self-Care Better’ virtual event for staff in place of the regularly scheduled ‘Doing it Better’ rounds. As part of the event, a staff member who is a yoga therapist led a gentle yoga practice and a family medicine resident led a discussion around self-care and provided wellness resources. In addition, staff members had an opportunity to casually socialize.    Several ongoing initiatives developed as a result of this event. The yoga therapist began offering short virtual lunchtime yoga sessions for staff; a family medicine resident teamed with a member of the pandemic leadership group to prepare weekly wellness emails with funny memes, fun facts, beautiful photos and good news stories; and physicians began having regular ‘walk ‘n talk’ meetings to check in, share stories and provide peer support.
    2 1. Mental health and addiction support in primary care Mental Health in Primay Care During a Pandemic This presentation will focus on how our FHT addressed and acknowledged the increased need for MH services during a pandemic. A time of uncertainty and fear for all of us, but most importantly for those who struggle with mental health. It will include three key elements: 1. The Team Dynamic: The hardworking and adaptive MH team of clinicians who accommodated and transitioned to a virtual care model in a timely and efficient manner. 2. Relevance of MH Services During a Pandemic: The importance of continuing and acknowledging MH services and needs of our paitents during a pandemic. 3. Increased Access to MH Services: timely and increased access to MH services was implemented by using a virtual care model. The MH team were able to quickly transition to a full functioning MH virtual team without interupting or reducing services. The Team willingly and confidently worked from their homes using telephone or zoom sessions. Our MH team still functioned at its full capacity with seeing patients individually or in groups virtually.
    3 1. Mental health and addiction support in primary care A Pharmacist-Led Intervention to Reduce Opioid-Benzodiazepine Co-Prescribing in Primary Care Primary care guidelines have reinforced that the high-risk profiles of opioids and benzodiazepines can lead to substance use disorder and other complex complications. However, there is little guidance and support on how providers should approach deprescribing of concomitant opioids and benzodiazepines. In early 2018, the St. Michael’s Hospital Academic Family Health Team (SMHAFHT) launched an intervention which aimed to reduce opioid-benzodiazepine co-prescribing through proactive, pharmacist-led discussions. In this program, a pharmacist embedded in the family health team reviewed the electronic medical record (EMR) of patients prescribed opioids and benzodiazepines to identify the indication for prescribing, whether other options have been considered and whether a trial of tapering was previously considered. The pharmacist then met with the provider one-on-one at a mutually agreed upon time to discuss treatment and management strategies for the patient. Strategies sometimes included the involvement of a social worker or addictions specialist for greater interprofessional collaboration. Once actions to address the co-prescription are planned, the pharmacist, and/or physician followed-up with the patient (if indicated) to discuss potential de-prescribing and to create a prescribing plan that met the needs of the patient. Quality improvement methods were used to iteratively refine the intervention. In this presentation, we will describe the refinement and spread of this intervention to all six clinics at the Family Health Team and the lessons learned to date. The presentation will provide attendees with practical tools and approaches that they could apply in their teams to reduce opioid-benzodiazepine co-prescribing and high-risk opioid use more generally.
    4 1. Mental health and addiction support in primary care

    Strengthening Client Engagement in Collaborative Mental Health Care: An Interactive Workshop to Enhance Healthcare Engagement Practices

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

    Chat session for this poster will be available on Friday, Oct. 9, 12:00 noon- 12:30 at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Engaging clients in their care is a priority because it improves care quality, lowers healthcare costs and enhances client experience and clinical outcomes. Engagement is critical in primary care because of the fundamental importance of client-provider relationships. Engagement remains a challenge, however, because of time constraints and cultural and structural barriers. COVID-19 has introduced new challenges to engagement with the utilization of virtual platforms to deliver care. To improve collaborative mental health care (CMHC), we conducted five focus groups with 50 people living with mental health challenges in Toronto and Thunder Bay. We then conducted a knowledge-to-action project that was guided by tenets of community-engaged research and user-centered design. We synthesized the focus group findings and then consulted with 17 clients and 8 healthcare providers to develop a toolkit to facilitate dialogue about mental health challenges between clients and providers. The toolkit, provides clients with tips when navigating care for their mental health concerns. It can be a resource for healthcare providers in various settings, especially because it can be integrated in digital and in-person contexts. This interactive workshop will: i) describe our approach to developing a mental health toolkit including building consensus and negotiating content across diverse stakeholders; ii) discuss the nuances between individual and community engagement and why this matters when designing, delivering, and evaluating CMHC; iii) strategize how the mental health toolkit can enhance dialogue between providers and clients; and iv) interactively identify strategies to strengthen client and community engagement in care delivery including through virtual platforms. 
    5 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care

    An interdisciplinary and collective approach to continuing the CHANGE Program at Summerville Family Health - Adapting and delivering virtual programming during unprecedented times

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

      Chat session for this poster will be available on Thursday, Oct. 8, 4 :00 pm – 4 :30 pm at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Summerville Family Health partnered with Metabolic Syndrome Canada to offer the CHANGE (Canadian Health Advanced by Nutrition and Graded Exercise) Program, an evidence-based diet and exercise program aimed at reversing metabolic syndrome and reducing cardio-metabolic risk in primary care settings.  The program began as planned, with dietary and fitness assessments offered in person, followed by three weekly group education sessions taking place at a local community centre. The pandemic then forced stakeholders from both organizations to completely shift processes and tactics, in an effort to minimize disruption to the program.  Content originally prepared for education sessions was adapted for virtual offerings.  Communication tactics were employed to maintain high levels of patient engagement.  Additional topic areas and resources were offered to enhance support and overall well-being of patients.  Various IHPs were invited to present and share expertise, where previously, they may not have been able to attend.  Mental health became a significant focus, with relevant tools and practices shared throughout each session.     
    6 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care

    Transitioning to Virtual Care: Patient, Provider and Organizational Considerations

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

      Chat session for this poster will be available on Thursday, Oct. 8, 4 :00 pm – 4 :30 pm at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Digital healthcare solutions are increasingly widespread and available, and offer patients the opportunity to utilize virtual methods to enhance access to care. During the COVID-19 crisis, a need to rapidly embrace virtual care arose to meet patient care needs, particularly in vulnerable populations. This required a change in patient care delivery, from being primarily in-person office visits, to being almost wholly virtual. In fact, prior to the pandemic, less than four percent of all primary care visits in Canada were done virtually. This significant transition in care delivery, coupled by limited healthcare resources and capacity, required consideration into change management strategies and warranted inquiry into the perception and experiences of care providers and patients, as well as the impact it had on care outcomes.     The North York Family Health Team (NYFHT), one of the largest, community, multi-site FHTs, quickly mobilized their primary care team to support the health of their patient population. To support wraparound care, virtual care was offered remotely to patients to maintain the health management and wellness of our patients. Such efforts were taken to improve timely access to care and to keep patients out of the emergency room. This included adoption of virtual care practices for both clinicians and patients via telephone calls, video appointments, and secure messaging. This transition was supported by the creation of organizational policies, privacy considerations, implementing clinician training, and continuous feedback and data measurement.     Understanding the perceived value and experiences of digital health service uptake is imperative to the sustainability of such practices.  This presentation aims to provide insight into the experiences of virtual care adoption from multiple perspectives, including the: 1) patient, 2) care providers, and 3) organizational level. An exploration into the perception of patients and providers was examined, such as their comfort level with different modalities of virtual care, preferences, and perceived benefits and challenges to virtual care. Enablers and barriers to implementing virtual care amongst a team of multidisciplinary team members will also be shared.  
    7 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care CovidCare: Virtually managing patients from home through a partnership in East Toronto Covid-19 has transformed the way the healthcare is being delivered.  With many hospitals and primary care offices limiting in person appointments, there has been an accelerated use in telehealthcare.  The symptoms of Covid-19 vary and patients can experience a rapid deterioration in health.  Many patients diagnosed with Covid-19 require close monitoring , but not necessarily in the hospital setting.   A partnership was formed in the East Toronto involving the South East Toronto FHT (SETFHT), Michael Garron Hospital (MGH), community physicians and Ontario Telehealth Network (OTN).  Together a team of physicians, registered nurses, registered practical nurses and administrative staff created a virtual telehealthcare program involving the use of the Vivify platform provided through OTN to remotely monitor patients from home.     
    8 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care Delivering Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Insomnia via Virtual Platform We hope to share our approach and experience in transforming our program from face-to-face to virtual encounters by adopting different technologies and virtual platforms for the Sleep Therapy Group Program.      Patient recruitment and assessment were completed primarily by online surveys administered via Qualtrics. Program delivery was transformed from face-to-face to virtual Zoom platform. Program materials were transformed from Word document handouts to PowerPoint presentations to be shared via Zoom and electronically.     Patients interested in participating in this virtual program were required to have the following:  •    A valid email address  •    An internet connection  •    A device with webcam, microphone and speaker that can install Zoom (e.g. smartphone, iPAD, laptop computer with webcam)  •    A printer (optional for printing program material)    The program was delivered via Zoom virtual platform, where the following features were used:    •    The share screen feature was used to present program material, useful websites and smartphone apps.  •    The breakout room features were used to allow smaller group discussion with individual facilitators.   •    The chat feature was used to facilitate Q&A and encourage interactions with participants.   •    Although the poll feature was not used, it was also available and could be explored in the future for “Jeopardy for Insomnia Questions” or other components to encourage interactions or assessment of knowledge base.   
    9 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care

    Virtual Comprehensive Medication Reviews at a Rural Family Health Team in Northern Ontario

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

    Chat session for this poster will be available on Thursday, Oct. 8, 4 :00 pm – 4 :30 pm at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Pharmacist medication reviews (MR) in the primary care setting have shown to improve health outcomes.  A comprehensive MR includes `information regarding medication reconciliation, adherence, and optimization, as well as how patients use their medications and how to access their medications in the community’.  The Powassan and Area Family Health Team (PAAFHT) in a small Northern Ontario community lacked access to an on-site pharmacist to conduct MRs.  Using the already established Ontario Telemedicine Network (OTN) videoconference platform, pharmacists initiated a remote comprehensive MR program.  Patients eligible for an MR were 55 years or older and prescribed at least 15 medications.  Eligible patients were identified by electronic medical record (EMR) search. PAAFHT clerical staff contacted patients by telephone, and scheduled 1-hour MRs in the PAAFHT OTN room. The EMR, falls risk assessment tool, clinical practice and de-prescribing guidelines were used by pharmacists. Following the MR, an MR consult note with a physician notification flag was uploaded into the EMR and followed by the pharmacist for physician response.  Our review of the pharmacist comprehensive MR program demonstrates a feasible and acceptable opportunity to increase access for all Ontarians to a pharmacist care regardless of location or time of day.  Pharmacists can be part of an inter-professional and collaborative patient-centred care team, conduct medication management, ensure seamless care, follow up (in home or in clinic), patient coaching, disease prevention and self-managed care, all by utilizing established digital health technologies.      Further study could address impact on health care outcomes and utilization (ER visits and hospitalization).    
    10 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care The Electronic Asthma Management System (eAMS): Virtual Asthma Care In Your EMR The Electronic Asthma Management System (eAMS) was developed and tested as a scientific research project over the past 10 years, and is now being released for broad use. It addresses the 3 key asthma care gaps in primary care:   1. Determining a patient’s asthma control level  2. Ensuring that therapy matches current guideline recommendations  3. Providing each patient with a self-management asthma action plan (AAP), which both empowers patients and reduces healthcare use    The eAMS is comprised of two parts. The first is a patient-facing app, where patients complete a simple questionnaire before their appointment. The second is a provider-facing computerized decision support system which is seamlessly integrated with PS Suite and OSCAR electronic medical record (EMR) systems. Algorithms process patient responses to determine asthma control and produce recommendations to help providers to optimize current pharmacotherapy. The system also generates a personalized AAP which guides patients in self-managing asthma symptoms in order to avoid exacerbations. The entire system can be used virtually by both providers and patients. Patients complete the questionnaire and providers run through 5 decision support screens in the EMR. Once the provider approves the patient’s AAP, it appears in the patient app for access at any time.     In this workshop, participants will have the opportunity to see how the eAMS works through an interactive, hands-on demo. Participants will be able to download the eAMS app on their personal devices to access patient-facing features and then view the corresponding clinician-facing EMR decision support content. 
    11 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care

    The Digital Pivot - A primary care team's approach to building sustainable digital solutions during a pandemic that won't turn back!

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

      Chat session for this poster will be available on Thursday, Oct. 8, 4 :00 pm – 4 :30 pm at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Overview:     Building on the existing EMR toolbar that is already an integral part of clinical practice across the 3 sites of the STAR FHT, additional digital tools were developed in response to the COVID19 pandemic in an effort to maintain patient centered care and expand the delivery of patient care in a virtual manner. The development of these digital tools combined with the use of Zoom technology, when most staff on the team were working from home, allowed for the ease of demonstrating their effective use across the 3 clinics and for staff working off-site. The success in achieving rapid staff adoption on how to use the tools to create an effective patient encounter relates to the frequent scheduled zoom meetings at the clinics, the opportunity to review recorded sessions, daily staff huddles, and the dedicated staff “champions” openness to spread their knowledge to assist other staff. These digital tools in combination with other strategies the team has implemented during this challenging time is proving to be an effective sustainable model for delivering patient care in a virtual format.     Program framework to offer digital solutions as well as spread and team-wide adoption:     It begins with a comprehensive EMR toolbar that contains many important digital tools to support the clinical provider’s workflow ensuring that the patient visit is efficient at the same time comprehensive to address their needs. With the onset of COVID19 in mid- March 2020, a digital tool called the “COVID19 toolbar” was developed. This supported the phone assessments with patients to screen for COVID symptoms and channel patients appropriately to receive a phone follow-up or a scheduled virtual visit from their family physician or Nurse Practitioner. The tool also supported tracking of “social check-in” calls by the Allied Health Team staff to vulnerable patients, like seniors. The staff member providing this type of call was able to access the STAR FHT website from the toolbar to provide appropriate community supports/resources to keep them independent and safe while most services were unavailable. Commencing the “social check-in” calls at the start of the pandemic, to-date, there have been over 1800 made across the team, all supported by a background of digital tools to help service the patient remotely.     For the last several years the STAR FHT has been keen to use the available technology to communicate with their patients, utilizing secure EMR messaging via Ocean to send attachments (questionnaires, results, etc.) to the patients’ email. Collection of patient emails and keeping them updated is integral to the development and use of the digital tools to support a virtual patient care framework, and at this challenging time has never been a more important strategy to help ensure a sustained care delivery. Team-wide, administrative supports have called patients to ask for permission to document and allow communication from the team via email. All clinical and Allied Health staff during phone encounters with patients, have supported the documentation of patient emails. This effort has proven invaluable, as the team has noted a sharp rise in documented emails since the pandemic was declared. Over 9,000 emails have been collected to-date, representing half of the STAR FHT roster size, with close to 4,000 being collected since March 2020.     Early on in the pandemic the team decided there was a need to immediately communicate to the patient population about how they would receive care during this challenging time in which clinics were forced to close. A letter was sent via patient emails to provide this information and also guidance on how to prevent contracting COVID19. A more recent letter was sent to over 8,000 patient emails providing updated educational information about “social bubbles during a pandemic”.     The use of email communication with the patient directs them back automatically to a “COVID19 Resource” page on the STAR FHT website. This is a clever use of technology, to “bring” patients to the key resources to help them remain informed and help them find supports during this very challenging time.  Since letters have been sent via email, to-date, there has been over 5,000 “hits” to this “COVID19 Resource page. Virtual program links and other resources are sent to patients interested in attending the STAR FHT’s many wellness programs that are now offered in a virtual format.     Utilizing patient emails and the appropriate digital tools like “Telus Virtual” supports the virtual visit “face to face” and the ever-important dialogue of a physician to their patient to discuss a diagnosis, view a skin condition, reconcile medications, or console their anxious patient. These are just a few of the many ways the physicians and clinical staff of the STAR FHT have utilized the virtual platform, and by all accounts, it is both positive for the patient and the provider. A team physician recently conducted a Coordinated Care Plan (CCP) with a patient, family and other involved organizations using “Telus Virtual” and found it easy and highly effective.     Many physicians on the team have expressed the interest to continue to offer virtual visits as an added component to how they provide care.  At the same time, many patients, anecdotally, have shared with their providers, that the virtual visit has enhanced their access in seeing their physician about a concern.     The challenges of continuing to provide patient care despite a pandemic has created for the STAR FHT a sustainable framework of digital tools to offer virtual care for their patients now and into the future. As a member of the Huron Perth & Area OHT, there is already sharing of these digital tools across the region for more patients to benefit.     
    12 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care Virtual Care Action Items To respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, health providers have been forced to take unprecedented measures of closing their doors and restricting access to in-person services. This has accelerated innovation and the adoption of virtual care solutions to enable health providers to connect clinical services with those in need. It is clear that virtual care is here to stay as an alternate or additional model of care. The delivery of virtual care is subject to a variety of legal requirements and regulated health professional guidelines. FHT virtual care offerings, policies and practices must be aligned with the requirements to which all of their practitioners are subject. In addition, FHTs must be aware of the additional risks and challenges of virtual care technology and clinical interactions. This Poster on Virtual Care Action Items provides FHTs with a checklist of the virtual care essential action items that can be used as a tool to support virtual care planning.
    13 2. Integrating digital health and virtual care Data-Supported Insights for Virtual Care Adoption in Canadian Healthcare Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, Canada’s healthcare system still followed the traditional model of in-office visits for every occasion, despite the heavy resource demands that accompany it. The pandemic demanded a new paradigm, however, and we saw a massive increase in adoption and use of Medeo, QHR’s virtual healthcare app, by both providers and patients. This widespread implementation has not only made it easier for healthcare to function safely in the current conditions, it’s also provided useful data that can inform industry and government in growing this important evolution in healthcare.  In this presentation, we’ll share utilization data from the last 6 months, with specific focus on Ontario as well as numbers from across Canada. Providers who have adopted virtual care will then discuss their introduction to it, the short- and long-term impact it’s had on their practices, its wide range of use cases, and the unexpected benefits it’s had on care delivery. Lastly, we’ll discuss keys to successful virtual care adoption going forward: structuring your schedule, appropriate applications, introducing it to patients, and virtual care’s advantages over telephone alone.  In the wake of this paradigm shift, we see the future of Canadian healthcare including a practical mix of online and in-person interactions between patients and their healthcare providers. We believe that video conferencing and secure messaging need to be the preferred online interaction mediums, and we believe primary care delivery will only improve when virtual care technology is used to improve access and convenience for everyone.  
    14 3. Integrated care and community responses

    The Extent of Polypharmacy in Recipients of Ontario Primary Care Team Pharmacist-Led Medication Reviews

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

    Chat session for this poster will be available on Thursday, Oct. 8, 4 :00 pm – 4 :30 pm at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Pharmacist-led medication reviews have been shown to improve medication management, by analyzing a patient's medications and reducing the adverse effects of polypharmacy among older adults. This presentation quantitatively examines the medications, medication discrepancies and drug therapy problems of recipients in primary care.
    15 3. Integrated care and community responses

    Implementing Case Management Services in an Urban, Academic Family Health Team

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

      Chat session for this poster will be available on Thursday, Oct. 8, 4 :00 pm – 4 :30 pm at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Care integration is vital to the delivery of excellent primary care, particularly in patients from a vulnerable population who have complex needs, of which social determinants of health may play a factor. These complex patients often need social services or care from multiple community partners, and as such may encounter difficulties with navigating care. This in turn, leads to an increased risk for poorer health outcomes.   Case managers provide patient-centered management and system navigation services to patients and families to supporting integrated, wraparound care. Case management address the complex needs of vulnerable patients, advocating for self-management support and better health care service integration; and has been linked with improved quality of life and reduced systems costs. At North York Family Health Team, a large, multi-site academic primary care organization consisting of 90 member physicians and 46 allied health professionals serving the North York region, it was identified that such a role was required to support excellent patient care. Frequently, patients may not be aware of existing resources in the systems, or may be sent from one service to another without addressing the core issue. A case manager’s role was implemented to address these systemic gaps in care. Patient outcomes & feedback though qualitative inquiry into the perceptions and experiences of clients with the care they received will be shared, as well as lessons learned with implementing this role in a primary care setting.  
    16 3. Integrated care and community responses Streamlining a pathway to timely post hospital discharge follow up in primary care - A Process Improvement at South East Toronto Family Health Team (SETFHT) The transition of care from the inpatient to the outpatient setting can be the most vulnerable point in a patient’s care trajectory, particularly in the elderly patient population and those with chronic medical conditions. As such, it is important to have a reliable process that can focus on bridging gaps and ensuring continuity of care. Effective interventions like post hospital discharge follow up, preferably within a week of discharge, can minimize hospital re-admissions and recurrent emergency department (ED) visits.   The importance of this initiative has been highlighted in the COVID-19 pandemic as transition of care across multiple healthcare settings, infection control and optimized healthcare utilization emerged into the forefront of our already strained healthcare system.   
    17 3. Integrated care and community responses Implementation of a Virtual Family Health Team during COVID-19 The North York Family Health Team (NYFHT) in collaboration with our local family medicine department and Ontario health team (NYTHP), launched a Virtual Family Health Team (VFHT) which provides virtual primary care assessments for patients with health concerns that cannot access their physician or do not have one.  We originally offered this to patients who needed follow up post-discharge from hospital for a COVID-related illness, however we had capacity to offer tpen this to patients discharged for any reason without primary care follow up.     Through partnership with the NYFHT, patients also have access to allied health services, including pharmacy, social work/case management, and nutritional support via physician referral.  For continuity of care, documentation from the encounter is sent to the patient's current physician if they have one who is not currently available.       Visits are conducted through video conference using a secure platform and require the use of an email to register using a link. We recruited a roster of physicians who accept new consults through this queue-based system.       A patient infographic and a business card version of it depicting the service was distributed to our community, including the emergency department, local pharmacies and congregate settings.  Through communication with our unit administrators, team leads and physicians, this service has been identified as a way for patients discharged from hospital to transition into the community and thus the infographic was included in each patient's discharge package with instructions on how to connect with a physician.   
    18 3. Integrated care and community responses

    Preparing a Future Generation of Team-Based Pharmacy Leaders to Advance Primary Care Practice: A Fully Accredited Pharmacy Residency Program in Collaboration with the University of Waterloo and the Centre for Family Medicine Family Health Team

    • Chat with the poster presenters at the conference!

      Chat session for this poster will be available on Thursday, Oct. 8, 4 :00 pm – 4 :30 pm at the AFHTO 2020 Conference.

    Pharmacists working collaboratively with other healthcare providers in primary care settings contribute to optimal disease management, medication use and cost-effective care. Nationally, there are approximately 700 pharmacists working in this role.     Residency programs are directed and accredited programs that build upon competencies of a pharmacy professional degree. While there are over 30 programs across Canada aimed at preparing pharmacists for hospital practice, there are very few residencies designed specifically for the innovative and ever-evolving world of primary-care practice.    The University of Waterloo-School of Pharmacy Ambulatory Care Residency was established in 2016. It is one of only three primary-care residencies in Ontario, and the only ambulatory care residency program in Canada fully immersed in a non-hospital primary care environment. The primary site for clinical training is the award-winning Centre for Family Medicine FHT in Kitchener Ontario. The pharmacy resident receives hands-on experience in a number of practice areas in chronic disease management (anticoagulation, diabetes, hypertension, dementia) and experience with teaching and research.    The overall goal for this residency program is to produce pharmacy practitioners who are well equipped to provide exemplary patient care in team-based primary-care settings. It also aims to cultivate pharmacy leaders amidst a system-wide primary health care policy change. Residents that complete this program will be more systematic in their approach to providing pharmaceutical care, have well developed critical appraisal skills and possess excellent problem-solving abilities. Most importantly, they will be highly effective members of multidisciplinary teams and can creatively navigate within the limitations of the healthcare system.
    19 3. Integrated care and community responses Working Together for Quality:  Key Themes for Ontario Health Team Partners Quality improvement is an important building block element for emerging Ontario Health Teams (OHTs).  OHT partners from primary care, hospitals, long-term care and community-based organizations may participate in various quality oversight processes, such as compliance inspections, accreditation, internal systems or other legislated mechanisms.     Although partner organizations within OHTs may have disparate quality oversight systems, a unique quality framework has been identified that can foster joint quality improvement for networked provider systems. In 2015, an international review of pre-existing quality standards for networks was conducted in response to changes in the field of human service delivery, including the introduction of the Accountable Care Organization (ACO) model in the US.  With the introduction of OHTs in 2019, a crosswalk was conducted to compare the network standards with the OHT Building Blocks; strong alignment between the two documents was identified.    This workshop will explore international consensus standards designed to support quality practices for service delivery networks such as the ‘backbone structure’ of OHTs.   Field-driven standards discussed will include common business practices, integrated network planning, provider selection/inclusion criteria, contracting, policies and procedures, data collection, communication, service coordination, and analysis of services.  As an alternative to a requirement of external accreditation or quality designation for all partner agencies, a process for ongoing quality review of participating providers in a network will also be discussed, and recommended elements of the review for organizations of all types will be presented.  
    20 4. Public health and primary care Local disease landscape transformation: physician perspectives on the impact of climate change  In 1988, the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recognized climate change as a key factor affecting population health worldwide. In fact, between the years of 2030 and 2050, 250 000 people will die from direct effects of climate change. Although there is Canadian literature on this topic, no emphasis has been placed on its impact on the disease landscape in the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network (WWLHIN). In the WWLHIN, the average temperature has risen by 1°C in the last 20 years, and this trend is predicted to continue.     Climate change, similar to other determinants of health, disproportionately affects marginalized populations through multiple pathways such as the lack of resources to cope with extreme temperature, exposure to air pollution, and food insecurity. As international studies continue to correlate climate change with adverse health events, these populations are at increased risk of illness.     We aimed to better understand local health care practitioners’ perspectives on climate change, the impact it has on diseases they manage, as well as identify gaps in the education of primary care practitioners on this topic. An REB-exempt, online 15-question survey was developed and disseminated to physicians in WWLHIN.    Many Canadian medical education (MedEd) curricula lack climate-related learning objectives. With the results, we can advocate for curricula development, conduct additional research, and inform policy. This will allow primary care systems to preempt and adapt to climate change impacts on the health of society, including vulnerable populations who are disproportionately affected.   
    21 4. Public health and primary care COVID-19 Resources in Family Health Teams This presentation will provide an overview of the COVID-19 resources provided by the Centre for Effective Practice (CEP) including clinical guidance for primary care, maintaining regular primary care practice, primary care operations, managing Type 2 Diabetes, social care guidance, local services, and Ontario Assessment Centres. There will be a brief overview defining academic detailing and the evidence to support its use in primary care. The Hamilton Family Health Team (FHT), Thames Valley FHT and Prince Edward FHT will describe their academic detailing experiences and how it impacted primary care services during COVID-19.
    22 4. Public health and primary care Clinical pharmacist-led medication reconciliations and medications reviews: a proposal for a standardized process and outcome measures to improve care and optimize resources The research proposes a standardized assessment form for the direct patient care work of a clinical pharmacist. This form can be used for any medication reconciliation and medication review process. It proposes the collection of social determinants of access to medications, the assessment of the management of medications, adherence, outcome measures to assess factors impacting access to medications, identified pharmacotherapeutic issues according to Heppler and Strand, and qualifying these according to severity and complexity of case. In addition, cost on the health system level and patient level are assessed. The outcome measures chosen, if applied cross FHTs, will allow a sector wide comparison of the work of the clinical pharmacist in quantitive, qualitative and cost aspects. It will provide information to initiate focussed quality improvement projects to improve care and measurable outcomes for patients. 
    23 5. Addressing social determinants of health Mobility Clinic COVID-19 Pandemic Patient Outreach Program Individuals with physical disabilities are at greater risk for adverse health events during COVID-19. There is limited access to health care and resources, which means a greater risk of health destabilization, social support disruptions, and increased social isolation, all of which can have detrimental effects on the physical and mental well-being of individuals with physical disabilities.    An outreach program was developed to proactively identify issues that may be exacerbated by the pandemic and help to identify risks and mitigate them where possible. The screening algorithm was developed by our interdisciplinary Mobility Clinic team, and focuses on 5 domains: health destabilization, mental health, access to services and supports, social isolation, and caregiver stress. The screening algorithm was administered by phone to individuals identified as past and current Mobility Clinic patients. Any risks identified received further investigation by the team. We also used this contact as an opportunity to inform and educate patients on the risks of COVID-19 and what they could do to protect themselves. After the initial calls, we continued to follow up with patients every 6-8 weeks throughout the duration of the pandemic to identify new risks or concerns.    The outreach program helps us to proactively identify risks for individuals with physical disabilities and address any healthcare needs they have. On a wider scale, the program can be modified and employed for other vulnerable populations that are at increased risk for health destabilization and support disruptions, including frail and elderly individuals.

     

    Online Poster Gallery

    To share your initiative with as many of your peers as possible, an online gallery of posters will be made available to attendees on the virtual platform during the conference. Your poster PDF will also be uploaded to AFHTO’s website in the member section after the conference. Please upload your poster PDF to your presenter management portal by noon on September 29th, 2020 (extended deadline).
    Details on accessing your presenter management portal on the AFHTO 2020 Virtual Conference platform will be shared with you on the week of September 21, 2020.

    Registration

    AFHTO’s policy is that all who attend the AFHTO conference, including poster presenters, must register for the conference at the appropriate rate. Please click here to register if you haven’t already done so.

    Interactive Session Option with Attendees

    We are opening up an optional opportunity for poster presenters to interact with conference attendees for 30 minutes. This window of opportunity will occur on the day that the theme of your poster is released (see below for timing)

    Taking into account that there will be a limited number of attendees who may have viewed the poster prior to this optional interactivity session- If you or your presenters intend to partake in this optional interactive opportunity, please e-mail conference@afhto.ca to let us know your intention to participate, as well as the names of participating poster presenters, by October 2nd, 2020.

    Day 1 Themes 2, 3 and 4
    Posters and on-demand interactive opportunity
     4: 00 – 4: 30   p.m.
    Day 2 Themes 1 and 5
    Posters and on-demand interactive opportunity
    12:00 – 12:30 p.m.

    Since this year’s conference is virtual, we strongly recommend that you publish contact information on your poster. We suggest information on which of your poster presenters will be available during the conference and possibly contact e-mail(s) or phone number(s). This allows delegates who find your poster interesting to ask you questions later.

     

    Poster Display Guidelines:

     

    Tips for a Memorable Poster

    There will be about 40 posters at the conference, which means no attendee will be able to engage deeply with all of them. You need to have an attention-grabbing poster that will draw people in and make a big impact on them in a small amount of time. Thomas Erren and Philip Bourne have published a great list of ten simple rules for a good poster presentation; below are just a few of the highlights:

    • Determine the purpose of your poster before you start preparing it. 
      • “…ask yourself the following questions: What do you want the person passing by your poster to do? Engage in a discussion about the content? Learn enough to go off and want to try something for themselves? Want to collaborate? All the above, or none of the above but something else? Style your poster accordingly.”
    • Sell your work in ten seconds. Prepare a quick “elevator pitch” that starts with an attention-grabbing statement or questions and then follows up with the thesis or major finding explored in your poster.
    • Choose your title wisely. It may be the only thing attendees see before deciding whether to visit.
    • Good layout is essential: 
      • Leave plenty of white space, which puts a reader at ease. 
      • Guide the reader through the information using arrows, numbering, or whatever else makes sense for your data. 
      • Never use less than 24-point font, and make sure the main points can be read at eye level, at a conversational distance
    • Be concise! Remember that a (good, carefully chosen) picture (graph/ table/ diagram) is worth a thousand words. Use graphics that can be understood at a glance but provide more detailed information upon closer inspection.
    • Be friendly, personable, and responsive to readers’ questions, but allow them to read your poster at their own pace. Provide business cards or handouts with your contact information in case they wish to follow up later.